DIY Minky Baby Blanket with Satin or Ruffle Trim

For my very first Mother's Day/Early 'Push Present' my husband got me a sewing machine! (It was between this and an iPad, and I figured with a little girl on the way, the possibilities for sewing adorable clothes were endless!)

I had been searching everywhere for a plain light pink minky blanket with satin trim, but couldn't find what I wanted for under $40. SO I decided to get crafty and make this one myself... and it cost me less than $20 (thank you very much)!

I am going to show you two variations of a minky blanket... one with the satin trim and another with a ruffle trim! (And a special thank-you to my mom for sending the adorable elephant fabric she found for these blankets!)

What you'll need -
Satin Blanket:
  • Satin Blanket binding (for the first blanket I made my own satin bias tape trim by tediously cutting, folding and ironing satin fabric myself - but buying the pre-made stuff from the store is MUCH easier)
  • 1-2 yards minky fabric (or you could do minky on one side and a flannel print on the other side like the ones below. For the light pink one, I did BOTH sides minky)
  • Coordinating thread (that matches the color of the binding)
  • Sewing Machine
  • Pins

Begin by laying your fabric out and making sure it's trimmed so that all of the edges align. For the satin blanket, you'll lay your fabric right sides out. Then pin the sating binding all the way down ONE edge of the blanket, being sure to enclose both pieces of fabric. You'll use A LOT of pins here, because both minky and satin like to slide around! I placed pins about every 4-5 inches.


Sew down this edge using a zig-zag stitch along the satin binding. (Some biding has one side that's longer than the other, so make sure the 'shorter' side of the binding is facing up as you're sewing so you're sure to catch both sides.)

Now you need to turn the corner... It's not as hard as it looks, I promise. You're going to create a 'metered edge' here. You do so by folding the binding at a 90 degree angle (and using lots of pins)!


Fold the corner down so that the diagonal made meets where your stitches left off. 

Pin down the fold so it stays in place. Then continue pinning down the side. Continue sewing along each edge like this, one edge at a time, until you reach where you started.

Now to finish off the binding- You're going to overlap where you started...

As you see here, you'll create a metered edge on the final corner- then go past that along your first sewn edge. Trim the binding off and fold it over. I like to fold it at a diagonal.

Once you've sewn all the edges, I like to go back and stitch over each metered and folded edge - just to make sure everything's secure. Be sure every time you start and stop a line of stitching, to always back stitch so the threads don't come out later.



And there you have it!!!! A beautiful satin-trimmed baby blanket - one side minky and the other this adorable elephant print flannel (I don't know why it uploaded upside down) :(

And now for my personal favorite, the ruffle-trimmed baby blanket! This one may be easier for beginners, as your stitches aren't as visible because most of them get hidden between the fabric and you don't have to worry about the edges, because you can round them off quite nicely.

Ruffle Blanket:
  • Ruffle Bias Tape
  • 1 yard minky fabric (or you could do minky on one side and a flannel print on the other side like the ones below. For the light pink one, I did BOTH sides minky)
  • Coordinating thread (that matches the color of the fabric)
  • Sewing Machine
  • Pins
For this blanket you'll lay your fabric wrong side out (the right sides will be facing in touching each other) with your ruffle trim sandwiched in between the two layers of fabric.


For mine I went ahead and sewed the trim to one side of the fabric because I didn't want to catch the ruffle anywhere. But you could always sandwich everything together like this...

As you'll see, I trimmed the edges to a curve along the trim. Pin all the way around the blanket leaving at least 6 inches UN-SEWN so that you can turn the blanket right side out. I used a straight stitch for this blanket. (And don't forget to back stitch where you start and stop!)


Turn the blanket right side out. Where you left the opening you'll need to fold the fabric over and pin. Sew the fabric very close to the edge to secure it down. If you're OCD like me, you might want pink thread on top and white thread on bottom so it blends in with the fabrics. This can be done simply by using white thread in your bobbin and pink thread up top! :)




Ta Dah!!!!! You're done. Now you know how to make two variations of a beautiful minky baby blanket! These would make adorable, personal shower gifts for moms-to-be!


If you have any questions about this tutorial or any step of the way, be sure and comment and I'll be glad to help! 



 

5 comments:

  1. Great tutorial! Where do you find the ruffle bias tape? I'm going to start a blanket for my new little one soon, and to save time, I'd rather not create the ruffled or pleated edging myself. I can't seem to find it anywhere though. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My mom found the elephant/minky fabric and both the satin and ruffle bias tape at JoAnn's fabrics I belive. I've also seen it at Hobby Lobby and Walmart! Good luck. If all else fails, you can always purchase it online - I found some here... http://www.simplicity.com/p-4901-1-38-box-pleat-quilt-binding.aspx

      Delete
  2. This looks great. I plan to use minky on one side and flannel on the other. Question: Do you need to secure the 2 pieces of fabric in the middle or midway between the edges to keep it from "separating" (as in a quilt)? Or do the fabrics adhere to each other? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  3. After you have sewn your satin binding around the blanket, and you go back to stitch the mitered corners and the folded edge (overlap), what kind of stitch are you using? Is this still a zig-zag stitch or are you using a straight stitch here?

    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I didn't secure the fabrics together. Minky is naturally pretty clingy. Ours has been through the wash at least 10 times over the past year and a half and has held up nicely! The corner stitch was a zig-zag!

    ReplyDelete